Can 5G Make You More Vulnerable to Cyberattacks?

Many enterprises and sectors are unaware of the 5G security vulnerabilities that exist today. Choice IoT says it’s critical for businesses to have a plan for discovering and overcoming them at the outset of a 5G/IoT platform rollout to avoid future cybersecurity disasters.

There is a big difference between the promise of 5G low latency, higher bandwidth, and speed for businesses versus the security of 5G. While many are excited about Gartner’s prediction of $4.2 billion being invested in global 5G wireless network infrastructure in 2020, few discuss the business costs of its unheralded security holes.

That’s an ongoing conversation that 5G and IoT solutions experts like Choice IOT’s CEO Darren Sadana are having with enterprises with 5G plans on the drawing board. “Businesses will need a strategy for overcoming 5G’s inherited security flaws from 4G or face major losses and privacy catastrophes.”

5G is poised to drive IoT, industrial IoT (IIoT), cloud services, network virtualization, and edge computing, which multiplies the endpoint security complications. Although the manufacturing sector cites IIoT security as the top priority, the combination of 5G security vulnerabilities may come back to haunt them.

The picture doesn’t have to be a bleak one for businesses and enterprises that want to maximize the benefits of 5G while eliminating its vulnerabilities across sectors like healthcare, utilities, finance, automotive, communication and many others.

A U.S. Senator, recently called on the FCC to require wireless carriers rolling out 5G networks to develop cybersecurity standards. Sadana and other experts make it clear that assessment, discovery, and planning are key. They form the foundation for 5G/IoT platform buildout vulnerability identification and system modifications that encompass IT/OT and wireless connectivity.

Sadana points to the NIST National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE), which is developing a NIST Cybersecurity Practice Guide. This will demonstrate how the components of 5G architectures can be used securely to mitigate risks and meet industry sectors’ compliance requirements across use case scenarios.

“While this goes a long way to providing a standardized practices roadmap for companies in creating 5G platforms that are secure, it’s only a start,” explained Sadana. “5G is still the wild west with things changing every day, so businesses need IoT/IT security expert partners that can help them plan from the ground up.”


Read more at: Help Net Security